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Red Horse by David Burke Fuses American and Asian Flavors

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Photos courtesy Red Horse

Famed restaurateur David Burke brings his steakhouse brand to White Plains with a Red Horse location at The Opus Hotel.

If you’re a fan of the show “Top Chef,” you’ve probably heard of David Burke, a culinary master renowned for putting a unique spin on American classics. His signature dishes include clothesline bacon, which is exactly what it sounds like (bacon hanging from a string) and angry lobster, a dish inspired by lobster arrabbiata. Burke’s biggest claim to fame is his notorious thick-cut steaks that are dry-aged and seasoned with his patented Himalayan sea salt.

Red Horse chef

Burke made a name for himself at New York City’s River Café, and became the first American to win the prestigious Meilleur Ouvrier de France, or MOF, in 1988. He went on to open several signature restaurants: David Burke and Donatella, David Burke Tavern, and Fishtail, to name a few. But in recent years, he’s branched out to the suburbs, turning to Long Island, his home state of New Jersey, and north of the Hudson Valley in Saratoga Springs. The decision was driven by his clientele’s desire to eat well without having to travel far. “People are staying closer to home. You don’t need to go to New York City for everything anymore, including a great meal,” says Burke.

Red Horse dish

And now the famed restauranteur has added our region to his list of locales: following the success of Red Horse by David Burke—his modern American steakhouse with an Asian twist—in Rumson, New Jersey, Burke opened a second location at The Opus Hotel in White Plains this month. The 200-seat restaurant mirrors much of the menu and décor of the original—including a Himalayan sea salt wall, art from his personal collection (the Red Horse name was inspired by a painting Burke purchased from a Vietnamese artist), and fan favorites such as Asian-style crispy duck, salmon pastrami, steaks, sushi, and that angry lobster. The new space also complements its location inside a boutique hotel. That means fun music, lounge vibes, and a robust happy hour—think lobster dumplings, duck potstickers, and wagyu beef tartare, all under $10. “We want it to be social and to have an open feel where you can mingle, table hop, and the music is cool,” says Burke. “You can come in for a drink and a snack on a Tuesday and then come for dinner on a Friday and have a completely different experience.”

Red horse table setting

Of course, Red Horse is also open for lunch and Sunday brunch (featuring Burke’s famous pastry bar), plus offer private events and themed dinners, such as the 10-course omakase menu. All of which speaks to Burke’s belief that if you build it, people will come. “Everyone wants a quality place in their backyard.”

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